October 17, 2021

From Trash to Treasure

This sign was made in about 20 minutes (manufacturing time) by a faculty member at the School of Education learning the fantastic world of digital design and manufacturing! The wood with which it was produced was actually pulled from the rubbish bin, and is an old pine shelf reinvigorated. Learn CNC and digital design; come spend some time with the makerspaces, our student engineers, and learn how to turn your own trash to treasure.

Interested in Cosplay or Dnd?

Join Mikayla’s user group in the Small Hall Makerspace (Wednesdays at 1:00pm) to explore cosplay and make DnD minis.

Build out your research

One of the many goals of the Makerspaces at William & Mary is to help faculty, staff & students expand and develop their research paths. To this end we have already helped many faculty and staff prototype initial equipment, use our existing equipment for initial data collection, or borrow equipment for their own labs. For instance, did you know that we have a Flir handheld infrared imaging camera that faculty & staff (and students with an advisors’ permission) can reserve for use? Let us know how we can help.

Open for Summer ’21!

We’re here (albeit at very limited capacity) and are training, learning and building things! Our standard (walk-in) hours are 1-3pm, M-F, in Small Hall 224 (Makerspace Engineering & Applied Design Lab). We’re also ready to help you at most other times, put in a request through our online service desk and we’ll figure out what works for everyone!

Here we are going over toolpath generation & CNC machining!

A 2-Wire CNC Whiteboard Bot

We put together a simple 2-wire CNC robot in the Small Hall Makerspace Center that draws on the whiteboard! This is version 0.2; future versions will have pen retract among other features. This project will be added to the open source projects listing soon.

Happy April Fools!

We hope you all had a happy and safe all fools day today! A big thank you to the gifter of printer plants 🙂

3D printed drone parts

Dr. Donglai Gong of William & Mary’s School of Marine Science at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science stopped in yesterday to quickly prototype a nylon based, carbon fiber infused mounting component for an upcoming experiment using advanced drone based instruments. An hour or so after he arrived, he had designed and printed an ultra-strong, lightweight custom fit bracket embedded with continuous carbon fiber and was able to leave equipped to continue pushing the edges of marine science.